Fake just got Real

For art enthusiasts, forgers are regarded with a strange mix of disdain and curiosity. Why do they do it? How do they do it? And better yet - how do they get away with it? 

In the new documentary, Art and Craft, we get a peek into the mind of one of the most prolific art forgers in history -  Mark Landis. Over the years, Landis has tricked over 60 museums in 20 states into believing his replicas are the real deal. But why isn’t he behind bars? Well technically, he has yet to commit a crime. Indeed, Landis (who has been diagnosed as schizophrenic), has never profited from his replicas. Instead, he prefers the quiet thrill of pretending to be a philanthropist who generously donates rare pieces. 

Art and Craft opens next month in a select number of theaters

Watch trailer here: http://youtu.be/tudaAQ8VOBQ

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kaleidoscope lens

“These are the central concepts of my artistic essence. The transformation of motives therefore is a clearing of reality through optical reduction and refraction of contents. In this way it allows each observer an exempt view on the essential marrow. In this connection my process follows strictly the etymological translation of the word kaleidoscope, which has its roots in the greek language and means ‘to see beautiful forms’.” -Boris Draschoff, Berlin, Germany

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Art Meets Food: A Real Treat

When illustrator and designer Akihiro Mizuuchi designed a modular system to create edible chocolate LEGO bricks, the world became a better place. At least in our eyes. 

We’ve seen folks try this out before, but Akihiro’s chocolate LEGO’s seem to be the most precise of their kind. That’s because the system is designed to precisely pour the chocolate molds so that they pop right out when they cool down and function as real LEGO’s. 

Not sure these would last very long in our hands.

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Read more at: Legosaurus

A Perfectly Cozy Corner Shop

At a quick glance, it looks a lot like your average corner shop. But if you take a closer look, you’ll be pleasantly surprised. 

British artist Lucy Sparrow has converted an entire abandoned corner shop in Bethnal Green (east London) into a temporary art exhibition titled The Corner Shop. The exhibition features 4,000 hand-sewn felt products. Sparrow made sure to cover all bases - from magazines, candy, potato chip bags, condiments and a cash register. Sparrow spent about seven months to create her felt inventory (she even started a Kickstarter for help).

Most items are available for purchase online.

(via My Modern MetLaughing SquidThe Jealous Curator)

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The Magical Lens of Oleg Oprisco

Photographer Oleg Oprisco has mastered capturing surreal  and fantastical stills of his subjects. And it continues to blow our mind.

In order to achieve these perfect moments, Oprisco spends much of his time looking and searching through flea markets to find props and costumes. Oprisco is said to sketch many of his photographs beforehand, with the final shoot requiring 2-3 days of prep.

To check out more of his work see here

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Recreating Childhood Drawings

Artist Telmo Pieper took one look at his childhood drawings and decided his adult self could do better. And so he began photoshopping his childhood drawings.

Keeping the same dimensions and proportions, Pieper’s digital illustrations have breathed new life into his childhood drawings — yet somehow remain delightful and surreal. 

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Images by: TELMO PIEPER